Panic Attack Treatment | Natural Anxiety Cures

Herbal Remedies for Anxiety and Panic Attacks

Problems and difficulties in life are two of the most common culprits for suffering from anxiety. Although these are considered normal occurrences in life, there are some individuals who are easily overwhelmed by these situations that end up not being able to handle things properly. Unless they do something to get out of the situation, effects of stress will constantly haunt them to create more havoc in their life until the condition becomes a full-blown mental and psychological problem. Recently, more and more sufferers are paying attention to the possibility of herbal relief for anxiety because of acceptable results that it can provide in calming and relaxing one’s mind and body. There are a few home treatment programs full of natural calming techniques that have helped thousands to find relief. Click here to read my reviews of the best home and herbal treatment program.

There are plenty of herbs that have long been used by people long ago because of their mild calming and tranquilizing effects. For example, the Polynesian plan known as Kava or Kava Kava in some cultures are equally effective with pharmaceutical formulated drugs used in relieving symptoms of anxiety and depression. However, precaution like with any kind of drug should be followed especially because this herbal medication is not to be taken by pregnant or nursing mothers and people under the age of eighteen because of the drowsy side effect that it may bring about. On the other hand, this is not enough to disregard the effectiveness of herbs used as solutions for anxiety relief because they are not life-threatening in nature. And generally, such herbs have milder and fewer side effects than drugs used to treat anxiety or depression.

The efficacy of home anxiety remedies that primarily focuses on herbs and other non-drug approaches for treating anxiety can even be more intensified by combining it with favorable changes in lifestyle. Diet and exercise are two staple components of a good herbal relief for anxiety program. Eating well balanced and healthy meals rich in vitamins, minerals like magnesium and other nutrients like iron can all be meaningful and useful in fighting against the vigor of anxiety symptoms. Another important consideration is to keep away from your old sedentary lifestyle but instead start moving so as to keep your mind and body preoccupied with plenty of wholesome activities, leaving no room for anxiety to set in.

While anxiety is often unavoidable, you can learn to manage stress in such a way that its effects will not be as overwhelming and as disturbing as you have expected. This is all possible if you keep up with the right management plan that natural remedies for anxiety can provide you with.

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How To Handle Panic Attacks

Every individual at some point in their life might have experienced bouts of panic attacks. It is a fairly common occurrence in a persons life. A panic attack is when an individual suddenly feels intense and abrupt expressions of anxiety and fear combined with discomfort that might be too hard to bear. It can occur anywhere, whether a person is at home, at work or even in public places, affecting millions of people from all over the globe. Now, if you are the kind of person that always experiences this troublesome condition then you should learn valuable tips on how to handle panic attacks. Click here for the most trusted and popular natural cure for panic attacks and general anxiety attacks.

The simplest symptom in recognizing that a panic attack is on its way of destruction is when suddenly lots of thoughts keep occupying your mind. When this occurs, the best way to handle panic attacks on initial onset is to go to a place that is quiet; a place where you can relax for a second until you notice that your once rapid heartbeat is gradually gaining its normal phase.

Once it struck, predominantly manifested by pounding heartbeat as if you can hear the sound all over, ignore everything within your environment and just concentrate thinking about a silent place until you have regained your composure.

Another way that can be effective in how to handle panic attacks is to keep busy. You will notice that when panic attack strikes, you will start to lose control suddenly. It then makes it crucial that your mind is occupied with something to do; something that keeps you in control. It can be a house chore or simply watching a relaxing TV show or even a kiddy show.

This may sound simple enough but it is really an effective on how to handle panic attacks – deep breathing! Yes, just take deep breaths as you think of a place that equals serenity and peace. It can also be a situation wherein you have found that tranquil feeling.

It is of greatest importance that you know the initial onset of your panic attacks. This is crucial so that you will be better prepared to deal with it before it turns into worst. There are available medical treatment options but still nothing compares to learning how to handle panic attacks while it is early. Frequent panic attacks can affect someone’s quality of life. You have to take responsibility within yourself to prevent it from getting worse.

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Anxiety in men and women: Who is more susceptible and why?

Stereotypically, women are considered worriers while men are portrayed as footloose and fancy-free. In truth, anxiety is a natural emotion for all humans. In fact, anxiety helps us avoid harm and danger. However, it is when anxiety becomes a chronic, even debilitating condition leading to a variety of symptoms such as depression, compulsion, phobia, and/or panic attacks where a cause for concern lies. And yes, women more likely to suffer from anxiety disorders and panic attacks.

As clinical social worker Jerilyn Ross, author of Triumph Over Fear: A Book of Help and Hope for People with Anxiety, Panic Attacks and Phobia, states “when anxiety becomes disproportionate to the situation and leads to avoidance of the fear-inducing situation and other undesirable consequences, it should be assessed”, she says. “And yes women are twice as likely to suffer.” But, why is it that women are more likely to experience anxiety and panic attacks than men?

Experts site both social/cultural and biological reasons that may contribute to a woman being more prone to anxiety and panic attacks than men. Cultural factors include the predominate ideal in society that women are expected to marry and raise children; that women are expected to bear the burdens of others and be caretakers, often to the neglect of their personal needs. Consequently, it is believed that because women are generally less assertive than men that women deal with more suppressed stress that eventually manifests itself through anxiety and/or panic.

Additional biological contributors, experts say, may include women undergo more drastic physical changes than men, including menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause which effect hormones and mood. Yet, while the exact cause of anxiety and panic attacks is unknown, and the specific reasons behind why women are more likely than men to experience such are also speculative.

In sum, anxiety is a very real condition. And, as with any disease or disorder, anxiety is not a respecter of persons. If you suspect that you may be suffering from one of the aforementioned conditions, remember that you do not have to live in fear. There is hope. There are various treatments to help you cure yourself of anxiety and panic attacks. Knowledge is power! And you have the power to take that first step toward conquering anxiety.

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How to Diagnose a Panic Attack

Your friends call you worrywart, because you are in a constant state of panic. Yet, something deep down tells you that its more than anxiety; rather, the episodic bouts of panic that feel much akin to a minor heartache are, perhaps, indicative of a very real condition known as panic disorder. If you do believe that you may, in fact, be suffering from this very real, and very treatable disorder, here are several helps tips to help you identify the signs and symptoms of panic attacks, and what you can do to help yourself:

The first step is to learn what panic attacks are, along with commons symptoms. Contrary to popular belief, panic attacks are not strictly related to events. For example, many individuals may experience a panic attack when anticipating the stress of an important exam, or when preparing for a job interview. Panic attacks can also occur unexpectedly, even in the middle of the night. The impact of worrying can bring about the symptoms of a panic attack, or an attack itself. Knowing what stressors may make you more prone to panic attacks, and the symptoms associated with panic attacks (i.e., heart palpitations, sweating, shortness of breath, insomnia, dizziness, trembling etc.) will assist you with determining daily stress (which we all face) from something more serious, such as panic disorder.

Secondly, you will want to document each time you experience any of the aforementioned symptoms. Anytime you may feel that you are experiencing an anxiety attack, be sure that you document. This will help you identify any patterns, and assist your doctor with a possible diagnosis and subsequent treatment. In this journal, you will want to note the intensity and frequency of such attacks, along with any physical symptoms that you may be experiencing. Additionally, you will want to take note of any events/causes that may have contributed to the panic attacks. Examples of possible triggers can include: financial difficulties, an argument with spouse, the fear of losing your best friend (whether it is real or imagined), illness, change in sleeping or eating patterns, starting a new job, anything that you may feel be contributing to your anxiety and thus causing panic attacks, is worthy of documentation. This will help assist your doctor with diagnosis, and identifying viable treatment options.

If you are experiencing profound anxiety over an extended period of time; if you feel that the panic attacks are becoming more frequent and, perhaps, debilitating, you should consult either a physician or mental health professional for proper diagnosis. Only a doctor can proper diagnose panic attacks, anxiety, and panic disorders. Depending on the severity and frequency of symptoms, your healthcare professional may suggest natural remedies for panic attacks, or provide tools and tips that will help you cure yourself of anxiety and panic attacks. Either way, treatment for anxiety attacks is best done through an open, honest two-way dialogue between patient and doctor.

Remember, you are your own best advocate. You do not have to live with panic attacks. You can treat anxiety attacks, and live your best life by making that first step today!

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Take Control of Your Life: Handling Panic Attacks

More than 150 million Americans suffer from panic attacks every year in the United States, this according to the American Psychological Association. A racing, erratic heartbeat that feel akin to a heart attack; the sudden cold sweats; the sleepless nights tossing and turning, feeling that you can’t turn your mind off; the unquenchable pain in the pit of your stomach… it is enough to make you dread ever going out in public for fear that another panic attack might come unexpectedly. Yet, despite the pain of living with anxiety and panic attacks, there is hope. You do not have to live in fear. In this article, you will learn valuable tips for panic attacks, how to handle them, and take control of your life. Do not let panic attacks define you, Click here for a natural technique to stop panic attacks.

Interestingly, with each anxiety attack you experience, your chance for more panic attacks increases. In other words, you become more physiologically prone to panic attacks. It’s akin to a pot of boiling water. The water has already begun to spill over, and the temperature does not decrease, the water will continue boiling over. The good news is that you do not have to walk on egg shells. In fact, more than nearly 90% of individuals who experience panic attacks find that, with treatment, they are able to manage their panic attacks. That said, here are some starter tips for panics attacks:

Relax and breathe! Let’s face it. Stress takes a toll on us mentally and physically. Stressful events (or even anticipated stress) deregulate our breathing, making it shallow and even difficult. Hence, the reason why many patients who suffer panic attacks will complain of a shortness of breath. Studies show that mastering effective breathing techniques, and learning relax the muscles in our bodies can help minimize the onset of panic attacks, even offset them entirely. If you anticipate an anxiety attack, take several very deep breaths and releasing the air from the lungs. Doing this for approximately one minute will help relax us by bringing oxygen to each of the muscles.

Additionally, when practicing breathing techniques, you can try scanning your body. Begin by sitting in a chair with your feet placed flat and firm on the floor. Focusing on your feet, begin tensing your feet muscles by curling your tools as if you were digging into the floor. Tense the muscles for five seconds, then release the muscles for another five seconds, repeating the process several times. Remember, to breathe deeply, inhaling and exhaling throughout the process so as to bring oxygen to each muscle. Once you have worked your feet, move up to the calves, thighs, abdomen, back (lower and upper), chest, neck, and face. Ever wonder why dancers portray an aura of control and inner peace? Well, the same exercises suggested in this article to help you handle panic attacks, are the same exercises dancers use while training. It is no coincidence that there is a direct correlation with a sense of mental well-being and physical fitness. Relaxing the body, helps relax the mind; therefore enabling you to better cope with panic attacks.

Speaking of relaxing the mind, consider taking what professional call a mental vacation. In other words, train your mind to think about positive events and people so as to divert your attention away from the stress and anxiety. For example, if you are having trouble falling asleep because you are worrying about the stack of unpaid bills on your desk, or you are concerned about whether or not a prospective employer will call you tomorrow, take a vacation-a mental vacation from your worries. Imagery can be quite helpful when dealing with anxiety. Try picturing yourself lying on a beach, with the soothing sounds of crushing waves nearby and the salty sea breeze tickling your nose. Or, perhaps, you are picturing yourself at the ballet drinking in the magic of colorful tutus flying across the stage. Whatever brings you joy and peace, picture it. Focus on it; allow the image of that peace and joy relax you. It is amazing how the power of positive thinking can change our attitude and stabilize both our emotional and physical well-being.

Change behaviors/habits. While panic attacks may wreck havoc on you mentally, physically, and emotionally, you have the power to control panic attacks. You do not have to live with anxiety, constantly worrying and being consumed by fear! When panic attacks occur, consider documenting it. Write down when they happen, what symptoms you felt, how long the episodes last, and try to identify possible triggers. If you notice that a panic attack occurs after you went shopping, because you spent money that you should have saved for gas and utilities, this is easily avoidable. By changing your spending habits, you can reduce your financial anxiety; therefore, in turn, reducing your likeliness for panic attacks. By adopting behaviors that will enable you to reduce and even relief stress, you can cure yourself of anxiety and panic attacks.

Seek help! You do not have to fight this alone. There is help available. By consulting a mental health professional, you can learn about natural remedies and tips for panic attacks. You can take control of your life with the proper anxiety treatment!

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Causes of Panic Attacks and How to Reduce Your Chances of Having One

It is 4:30 a.m. You have awoken suddenly from a nightmare; however, it wasn’t a nightmare. The sudden pain in your chest that pulsates throughout your body, the drops of sweat dripping from your brow, the dizziness, the symptoms are all too real. You may feel as though you are, quite literally, having a heart attack. Yet, you know better. It’s another panic attack. While many of us occasionally fret over life’s challenges, those who suffer panic attacks experience more than episodic stress; rather, a profound sense of fear and pending doom. The stress takes a physical toll on them, thus inducing a panic attack.

So what causes a panic attack? While the exact causes of panic attacks (or anxiety attacks) is relatively unknown, especially since fear and panic are natural emotions exhibited by human beings in times of stress or even danger. It is understood, however, that panic attacks are the result of a malfunction in an individual’s natural response to stress. Again, panic is natural. Yet, individuals suffering from panic attack disorder must learn to determine what triggered their response so as to better cope with reducing the frequency of attacks. For instance, if you find yourself waking up in the middle of the night worrying about your debts, or having difficulty falling asleep the night before an exam, you can logically ascertain that those are triggers. As such, you can begin learning effective coping mechanisms. In some instances, panic attacks are the result of natural causes (and not simply external stress of life events). For instance, asthma, diabetes, thyroid disorders, epilepsy, adrenal disorders, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or acute respiratory distress syndrome can induce panic attacks, or even increase one’s likeliness for panic attacks.

Additionally, if one is particularly prone to panic attacks, they may find it helpful to consult a therapist to determine whether or not the frequency is representative of a possible mood disorder such as borderline personality disorder (BPD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), post traumatic stress (PTSD), or major depression. In doing so, effective natural anxiety cures can be identified.

Speaking of treating anxiety attacks, treatment is usually based on both frequency and severity. Common anxiety treatments include the following:

  • Relaxation techniques such as progressive muscle relaxation, controlled breathing, and guided imagery may help reduce anxiety.
  • Biofeedback. Using sensors that measure physiological arousal brought on by anxiety (such as changes in heart rate and muscle tension), biofeedback teaches you to recognize and control these body processes.
  • Hypnotherapy. Hypnosis for anxiety is conducted by a clinical hypnotherapist who works with you using different therapeutic techniques while you?re in a state of deep relaxation.
  • Acupuncture. An ancient tradition in popular Chinese medicine, acupuncture may also help reduce anxiety.

Furthermore, natural remedies for anxiety attacks include valerian root and kava. Keep in mind, however, that the effectiveness of such natural anxiety treatment is not well-documented. As such, it is recommended that individuals suffering from panic attacks consult a trained therapist for advice on finding natural anxiety cures such as those previously mentioned.

Remember, panic attacks are a very real disorder. Yet, you do not have to live with the pain of anxiety. Panic attacks are treatable. If you or someone you love suffers from panic attacks, Click here to find helpful tips for panic attacks. With the information and tools found here, you can learn how to cure yourself of anxiety and panic attacks.

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Conquering your fears: How anxiety and panic attacks affect others

Millions of Americans suffer from panic attacks each year, according to the National Institutes of Health. Yet, anxiety and panic attacks not only affect the person suffering; rather, panic attacks affect friends, family members, and even coworkers, as well. If someone you care about is prone to anxiety and panic attacks, here is some helpful information and tips for panic attacks. In this article you will learn how panic attacks not only affect the individuals suffering, but how panic attacks affect you as the friend, family member, or associate.

For starters, the best way to support a loved one who suffers from anxiety and panic attacks, even depression, is to be a sounding board. This may sound simple, but the trick is to maintain your own health and well-being; to not neglect your needs as you help care for the needs of others. Giving someone with anxiety permission to express their thoughts, feelings, and concerns enables them to better cope with that anxiety. The objective in serving as a sounding board is to help the individual learn effective coping mechanisms. It is not, however, your job to take on the problem for them. Additionally, by allowing the person to communicate their feelings with you, they should begin to identify triggers and patterns so as to reduce their likeliness of future panic attacks. Through open, honest dialogue, they can learn how to change behaviors and find the proper anxiety treatment. Remember, it is not your job to take on the problem yourself; rather, be a source of strength and support.

That being said, other proven effective ways of helping a loved one dealing with anxiety and panic attacks include:

Set personal boundaries. Sometimes when we love someone, we think that by saying “no: we are not being a good friend, spouse, caregiver, or even a good person. This is not true. By knowing our own personal limitations, we can actually serve our loved ones better. In being open and honest, and knowing our own limitations, the seeds of effective communication are bred. And, good communication is essential in any relationship. If a friend or spouse who knows that they can be honest with you, and get an honest response in return, will not only appreciate and trust you more, but will communicate with you more, as well. Moreover, by setting personal boundaries, you will avoid any potential resentment of the other person’s problems and struggles. You will also avoid emotional exhaustion. In other words, setting personal boundaries helps you maintain a level of self-preservation which is good for both you, and your loved one.

Educate yourself. It is important to educate yourself about panic attacks-what triggers them, the signs and symptoms, and effective anxiety treatments. Occasionally, at the peak of frustration, we forget that anxiety attacks/panic disorder is a real condition that requires treatment. It is not as if the individual is choosing to have a panic attack. When we understand more about what a person is feeling and thinking when experiencing panic attacks, we are better equipped to support them as well as maintain our self-preservation.

Encourage, reassure, and support. Depending on the level of anxiety your loved one experiences, it may be helpful to not only encourage them to seek the advice of a mental health professional but also seek personal support. As you research panic attacks and encourage your loved one to explore anxiety treatments, you may seriously consider seeking support to help you cope with the secondary effects.

In sum, so as to help another person we must also help ourselves. By becoming informed about panic attacks, anxiety treatments, you will not only better support your loved one but you will be better equipped to cope with the secondary effects. It is never easy watch a loved one face the potentially debilitating effects of panic attacks, as such it is important to be aware of how their condition may affect you so that you can help them, help yourself, and nurture your relationship together. Remember, the only thing to fear is fear itself. When we understand that anxiety attacks are a real, but very treatable condition, we are better able to empower others in the healing process. Panic attacks do not have to control your life. We each have the power to conquer our fears.

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Understanding Anxiety and Panic Attacks

Each of us experience stress and know what it feels like to worry. Yet, how do you know if the constant worrying you feel is actually symptomatic of something more serious, such as an anxiety disorder. Many individuals with anxiety disorders are often dismissed as lacking willpower to simply get over problems and buck up; rather, the overwhelming feeling of constant worry, fear, stress, insomnia, and muscle tension, even panic attacks are very real. Fortunately, anxiety disorders are treatable. Yet, in order to better understand anxiety disorders, we shall discuss common types of anxiety.

Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Individuals with generalized anxiety order experience pathological anxiety. In other words, they constant worry about every aspect of their life. They live in constant fear of something bad happening, analyze and dissect what other people say and do (even what they, themselves, say and do), and avoid certain situations for fear of appearing inadequate or inferior. Typically generalized anxiety disorder can be treated through psychotherapy (talk therapy) which includes behavior therapy, aimed at retraining one’s thoughts and reactions to potential stressors.

Panic disorder/panic attacks

Perhaps, the most well-known but least understood is panic disorder, or panic attacks. The emotional and physical responses of a panic attack can be so severe that an individual may feel as though they are experiencing a heart attack. Typically triggered by a stressful event, or the anticipation of a stress event (i.e., public speaking, taking a test, seeing an old boyfriend, a tax audit, appearing in court, or any other stressful event), panic attacks can induce a series of symptoms including: heart palpitations, cold sweats, trembling, muscle contracting, twitching, blurred vision, insomnia, shortness of breath, sensitivity to light and noise, racing thoughts, and irritability. Depending on the severity and the frequency of the panic attacks, individuals may benefit from counseling, support groups, antidepressants, exercise, and other natural anxiety treatments to help relieve stress.

Social anxiety

The underlying premise behind social anxiety is the fear of social situations, which stems from the fear of possible embarrassment, ridicule, prejudgment and/or humiliation. Individuals who suffer from social anxiety may avoid social interaction with strangers, or even avoid public places entirely. The very thought of being among a crowd of people, or walking down a busy street can be so intimidating that the individual may experience panic attacks. Social anxiety is generally treatable with therapy and, depending on the severity, medication.

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is a serious form of anxiety in which a person either relives a traumatic event from the past, or lives in constant fear another traumatic event is about to occur (or both). Once thought to be more common among veterans of war, psychologists are seeing PTSD in abused children, rape victims, survivors of natural disasters and other ordeals. PTSD can be a debilitating condition, interfering with daily activities and even interpersonal relationships. Many individuals with PTSD complain of terrifying thoughts and dreams, a constant sense of pending doom and paranoia, and may suffer from frequent, unexpected panic attacks at the slightest perception of danger or stress. PTSD usually requires psychotherapy and other natural treatments for anxiety.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is, perhaps, the more serious form of anxiety. OCD is indicative of a neurobiological dysfunction that causes an individual to repeat unnecessary rituals compulsively. Whether it be checking and rechecking to see if doors are locked multiple times, even after the individual knows the door is, in fact, locked; or compulsively washing hands and counting steps while walking, OCD often interferes with an individual?s ability to perform daily activities. While panic attacks are not necessarily symptomatic of OCD, individuals may experience intense anxiety manifested through panic attacks, at the thought of diverting from rigid patterns and/or when certain behaviors and routines are challenged.

Phobias

By definition, a phobia is the intense fear of something real or imagined. Whether it is the fear of snakes and spiders or the fear of heights and tunnels, phobias are irrational reaction toward a perceived danger. Phobias are more than anxiety; rather fear that manifests itself through illogical behaviors including avoidance, even panic attacks at the sheer thought of coming into contact with the object of fear.

In summary, anxiety is a very real condition. Yet, it is very treatable. If you suspect that you may be suffering from one of the aforementioned conditions, or you have a loved one battling anxiety, remember that you do not have to live in fear. There is hope. There are various treatments for anxiety designed to help you cure yourself of anxiety and panic attacks. Knowledge is power! And you have the power to take that first step toward conquering anxiety.

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Anxiety Attacks: What Causes Them and How To Reduce Your Chances of Having One

It is 3:30 a.m. You have woken up all of the sudden from a bad dream; however, it wasn’t just a dream. The instant pain you feel in your chest and pulsates through the body, the sweat dropping from your eyebrow, the lightheadedness, the symptoms are all too familiar. Often you may wonder if you’re having a heart attack. Yet, you know better. It’s another anxiety attack. Many people will worry about the obstacles that life bring, but those of us who suffer from anxiety attacks know that it becomes much more than just a worry. The stress that we feel can be monumental, with a profound feeling of fear and doom. This stress can take a physical on us, thus inducing an anxiety attack. Click here to better understand the symptoms of anxiety.

So, what causes an anxiety attack? While it is not clear what exactly causes anxiety attacks (or panic attacks), it is understood that anxiety attacks are the result of a malfunction in an individual’s natural response to stress. It should be known that fear and panic are natural emotions exhibited by human beings in times of stress and that panic is very natural and common. Yet, individuals suffering from anxiety attack disorder must learn to determine what triggered their response so as to better cope with reducing the frequency of attacks. For instance, if you find yourself waking up in the middle of the night worrying about your debts, or having difficulty falling asleep the night before an exam, you can logically ascertain that those are triggers. As such, you can begin learning effective coping mechanisms.

In some instances, panic attacks are the result of natural causes (and not simply external stress of life events). For instance, asthma, diabetes, thyroid disorders, epilepsy, adrenal disorders, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or acute respiratory distress syndrome can induce panic attacks, or even increase one’s likeliness for panic attacks. Additionally, if one is particularly prone to panic attacks, they may find it helpful to consult a therapist to determine whether or not the frequency is representative of a possible mood disorder such as borderline personality disorder (BPD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), post traumatic stress (PTSD), or major depression. In doing so, effective natural anxiety cures can be identified.

Speaking of treating anxiety attacks, treatment is usually based on both frequency and severity. Common anxiety treatments include the following:

Relaxation techniques such as progressive muscle relaxation, controlled breathing, and guided imagery may help reduce anxiety.

Using sensors that measure physiological arousal brought on by anxiety (such as changes in heart rate and muscle tension), biofeedback teaches you to recognize and control these body processes.

Hypnotherapy. Hypnosis for anxiety is conducted by a clinical hypnotherapist who works with you using different therapeutic techniques while you’re in a state of deep relaxation.

Acupuncture. An ancient tradition in popular Chinese medicine, acupuncture may also help reduce anxiety.

Furthermore, natural remedies for panic attacks include valerian root and kava. Remember, panic attacks are a very real disorder. Yet, you do not have to live with the pain of anxiety. Panic attacks are treatable.

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What Is A Panic Attack?

Contrary to popular belief, panic attacks are symptomatic of a very real disorder. The profound sense of terror and doom, the piercing chest pains and shortness of breath, the hot (or cold) flashes, choking, dizziness, and heart palpitations are not imagined; rather, represent a disorder that affects more than one third of Americans. So, what exactly is a panic attack? So as to help you better understand panic attacks, and how to cure yourself of anxiety and panic attacks, let us examine the disorder as a whole.

For starters, panic attacks are defined as a sudden and unexpected period of intense fear or discomfort that come almost out of the blue. The American Psychological Association puts it this way: “a surge of overwhelming fear that comes without warning and without any obvious reason. It is far more intense than the feeling of being stressed out that most people experience.” While the symptoms of panic attacks are commonly induced by stressful events or situations, there are also natural causes for panic attacks. Certain health problems such as adrenal disease, diabetes, or pulmonary disease can increase one’s likeliness for having panic attacks. In some cases, when panic attacks are frequent and severe, the cause may be attributed to chemical imbalances in the brain (i.e., depression) or past trauma (i.e., post traumatic stress disorder). That said, health professionals have identified three distinct forms of panic attacks:

Unexpected panic attacks occur spontaneously with a clear, discernable reason. Unexpected panic attacks might even occur when one is relaxed or asleep.

Situationally bound panic attacks are triggered by a specific situation (i.e., crossing a bridge, public speaking, or taking a test). Situationally bound panic attacks almost always occur immediately after one is exposed (or anticipates being exposed) to the situation they fear most.

Situationally predisposed panic attacks are similar to situationally bound panic attacks, in the sense that they are triggered by a specific situation. Yet, situationally predisposed panic attacks occur less frequently. Additionally, situationally predisposed panic attacks don’t always occur immediately after exposure to the feared situation. For example, if one’s panic attacks are triggered by public speaking, there are times when that individual will give a speech without having a panic attack, whereas the panic attack only starts after they have already been speaking for 15 minutes.

With that, what can you or someone you love do to help reduce their likeliness of having a panic attack? While the exact cause of panic attacks is unknown, there are natural remedies for panic attacks. Perhaps the most preferred method of anxiety treatment recommended by health care professionals is cognitive behavioral treatment. During cognitive behavioral treatment involves teaching patients how to effectively manage stress and emotions; to identify triggers and how to effectively cope so as to reduce panic attacks. This is generally accomplished through breathing and relaxation exercises, physical exercise (i.e., running, yoga, or dance). If one is particularly prone to panic attacks, they may be referred to support groups specifically geared toward anxiety treatment, even psychotherapy. In particularly severe cases, a patient may be prescribed medication (i.e., antidepressants) as a method of effective of anxiety treatment.

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